Home News Nigerian Couple Risk Jail Term For ‘Enslaving’ Woman In Ireland, To Pay Victim N7.5million

Nigerian Couple Risk Jail Term For ‘Enslaving’ Woman In Ireland, To Pay Victim N7.5million

by James Davies


A Nigerian couple, Osarobo John Izekor and his wife, Precious Izekor are standing trial for slavery offences for allegedly making a vulnerable woman “perform forced labour” in their home in Ireland.
 
The couple, according to a report by the Irish Mirror, will also have to pay £10,000 (N5 million) compensation to the woman who couldn’t read nor write.



They were said to have admitted that between September 1, 2016, and September 30, 2017, they “required another person to perform forced or compulsory labour.”
 
While the victim was forced to carry out domestic duties, a majority of the criminality was unpaid childcare.
 
The case was heard at Belfast Crown Court under the Human Trafficking and Exploitation Act. According to Crown barrister, Charles MacCreanor, the woman – who could not read or write arrived in Northern Ireland in 2011 and worked as a nanny for John Izekor’s sister for five years.
 
When John Izekor’s sister returned to Nigeria in Autumn 2016, she moved into Castlereagh Place and was told the money would be sent back to her family for any work she undertook.
 
During the 10-month period of offending, the woman was given a room, food and clothes but was not paid any money. In addition to this, the Izekors took possession of her passport and other documents but did not grant her access to them.
 
MacCreanor said that whilst living with the Izekors, the woman was in contact with a relative of John’s, who expressed a desire for her to return to Nigeria so they could get married.
 
This relative asked the woman about her documentation and visa status, and when she raised this issue with Precious, an argument ensued.
 
Despite her request for her documents, they were not handed over to the woman and the argument led to a “deterioration of relations.”
 
The woman subsequently searched for her passport and other documents when Precious Izekor was out. A few days later, she left the Izekors and went to stay with a friend.
 
This friend, the court heard, was concerned for the woman, felt she was being exploited and accompanied her to the Home Office.
 
When a Home Office official called at the Izekors home, Precious was asked about the woman, but she denied knowing her.
 
An investigation was launched which resulted in the involvement of the PSNI and the subsequent arrests of both John and Precious Izekor.
 
While police were interrogating him, John Izekor initially denied any wrongdoing and made the case they were letting the woman stay in their home and helping her.
 
In her interview, Precious told officers the woman was a family friend and was never asked to do any form of work or labour.
 
MacCreanor said there were text messages between the husband and wife which indicated the control they had over the woman whilst she was living with them.
 
He also said that she spoke to the police about her ordeal, and the woman said she felt isolated and alone whilst living with the couple.
 
Defence barrister Barry Gibson, representing John Ikezor, said that following his arrest, his client spent three months on remand.
 
He also spoke of Izekor’s university education, extensive work history and clear criminal record.
 
Precious Izekor’s barrister Gavan Duffy QC revealed there was a former good relationship between the two women, and said there was a complete lack of violence or physical assault.
 
After listening to submissions from both the Crown and defence, Judge Richard Greene QC spoke of the complexities of the case and said he wanted to consider several issues before passing a sentence.
 
After being told that the Izekors had previously lodged £10,000 to the court to act as a surety for bail, the Judge ordered that this money be paid to the woman they kept as a domestic slave.
 
Judge Greene told the couple the charge they pleaded guilty to was “an extremely serious offence” and released them on continuing bail ahead of sentencing, which is set to take place on June 27.



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